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Discover the Magic of Kenya's Lakes

Updated: 2 days ago


Kenya is renowned for its rich wildlife and stunning beaches, but did you know it's also home to some of the most exotic lakes in the world? From the dramatic landscapes of the Great Rift Valley to the tranquil waters of Lake Victoria, these lakes are a must-see for any nature lover.


Here are 15 lakes in Kenya that will take your breath away.


1. Lake Nakuru

Located on the floor of the Rift Valley, Lake Nakuru is famous for its vast numbers of flamingos. The sight of these pink birds covering the lake's surface is one of nature's greatest spectacles. Besides flamingos, you'll find rhinos, leopards, Rothschild’s giraffes, and zebras in the surrounding national park.


2. Lake Victoria

As Africa’s largest lake, Lake Victoria is a vital part of the ecosystem shared by Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. It's central to the Luo community’s fishing culture and offers stunning views and vibrant local life.


3. Lake Bogoria

About 60 km from Nakuru, Lake Bogoria is known for its hot springs and geysers. The saline lake's waters are so hot you can boil an egg in minutes! It's a geological wonder you don't want to miss.


4. Lake Baringo

This freshwater lake is a haven for birdwatchers, with over 400 bird species. Set against a semi-desert landscape, Lake Baringo is an oasis of life and color.


5. Lake Naivasha

Papyrus-fringed and at over six thousand feet above sea level, Lake Naivasha is the highest lake in the Rift Valley. It’s famous for its hippos and abundant birdlife, including fish eagles and marabou storks.


6. Lake Turkana

Known as the "Jade Sea" for its striking turquoise color, Lake Turkana is the world’s largest permanent desert lake. Its three island parks are UNESCO World Heritage sites, adding to its allure.


7. Lake Elementaita

This lake near Gilgil is the only breeding ground for pelicans in East and Central Africa. also home to smaller populations of flamingos and offers picturesque views from the nearby Nairobi-Nakuru Highway.


8. Lake Magadi

Surrounded by vast salt flats, Lake Magadi is a dramatic landscape where the soda water changes to pink under the sun. The hot springs around the lake offer a natural spa experience.


9. Lake Amboseli

Situated within the Amboseli National Reserve, this seasonal lake is mostly saline, creating a unique environment. During dry seasons, it transforms into a vast pan covered with saline earth.


10. Lake Jipe

Straddling the Kenya-Tanzania border, Lake Jipe is located in Tsavo West National Park. It’s perfect for those seeking tranquility and offers beautiful camping spots at the Lake Jipe Safari Camp.


11. Lake Logipi

Located in the arid Suguta Valley, Lake Logipi is a saline, alkaline lake. Its waters come from the Suguta River and hot springs, making it a fascinating place for geologists and adventurers alike.


12. Lake Alablab

This temporary lake fills up during the rainy season and joins with Lake Logipi. Its brief existence adds to the dynamic landscape of the Suguta Valley.




13. Lake Kamnarok

At the base of the Kerio Valley, Lake Kamnarok is a small but significant lake. It's part of the Lake Kamnarok Game Reserve, home to 500 elephants, making it an important ecological site.


14. Lake Chew Bahir

While primarily in Ethiopia, Lake Chew Bahir extends into northern Kenya when full. It’s a vast, seasonal lake that showcases the interconnectedness of regional ecosystems.


15. Lake Chala

Nestled near Mount Kilimanjaro and straddling the Kenya-Tanzania border, Lake Chala is a captivating crater lake. Its waters change color with the seasons, shifting from deep blue to turquoise and green, creating a mesmerizing display. This natural phenomenon, combined with the lake's serene surroundings, makes it a must-visit destination.


Each of these lakes provides a unique glimpse into Kenya’s diverse ecosystems and natural beauty. Whether you're a birdwatcher, geologist, or landscape enthusiast, Kenya's lakes promise to captivate and inspire.

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